Michael Fossel Michael is President of Telocyte

March 21, 2017

The Frustration of (Not) Curing Alzheimer’s

I am deeply frustrated by two plangent observations: 1) we squander scant resources in useless AD trials and 2) AD can easily be cured if we applied those same resources to useful AD trials. Applying our resources with insight, we will cure Alzheimer’s within two years.

The first frustration is that most pharmaceutical firms and biotech companies continue to beat their heads against the same wall, regardless of clinical results. Whether they attack beta amyloid, tau proteins, mitocondrial function, inflammation, or any other target, the results have been, without exception, complete clinical failures. To be clear, many studies can show that you can affect beta amyloid or other biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease, but none of these studies show any effect on the clinical outcome. In the case of amyloid, it doesn’t matter whether you target production or the plaques themselves. Despite hundreds of millions of dollars, despite tens of thousands of patients, not one of these trials has ever shown clinical efficacy. Yet these same companies continue to not only run into walls, but remained convinced that if they can only run faster and hit the wall faster, they will somehow successfully breach the wall. They succeed only in creating headaches, accompanied by lost money, lost opportunities, and lost patients. The problem is not a lack of intelligence or ability. The researchers are – almost without exception – some of the most intelligent, well-educated, technically trained, and hard-working people I know. The irony is that they are some of the best 20th century minds I know. The problem, however, is that it is no longer the 20th century. If you refuse to adapt, refuse to change your paradigm, refuse to come into the 21st century, you will continue to get 20th century results and patients will continue to die of Alzheimer’s disease. Money and intelligence continues to be dumped into the same clichéed paradigm of pathology, as we aim at the wrong targets and misunderstand how Alzheimer’s works. And the result is… tragedy.

The second frustration is that we already know the right target and we already understand how Alzheimer’s disease works. We are entirely able to cure and prevent Alzheimer’s disease now. At Telocyte, we already have the initial resources we need to move ahead, but it is surprising how difficult it is for some people — wedded to 20th century concepts — to grasp the stunning potential, both clinically and financially of what we are about to do at Telocyte. We can not only reverse Alzheimer’s disease, but we can also cut the costs of health care while creating a stunningly successful biotech company in the process. We have the right tools, the right people, the right partners, and the sheer ability to take this through FDA trials. Already, we have several lead investors committed to our success. We are asking for a handful of additional investors, those who can see what the 21st century is capable of and who can understand why Telocyte is both the best clinical investment and the best financial investment in innovative medical care.

 

January 9, 2017

Conceptual Blinders

 

A week or so ago, an AI beat the world’s reigning champion in the game of Go.

The odd thing is not that it happened, but how it was done. By itself, the victory would just be one more example of “computers beating humans”, but there is a far more interesting and important facet to this event. Not only did the AI beat the world’s Go masters and the reigning world champion, but it did it, not by being better at using the known strategies and tactics, long the province of Go adepts, but by using “unconventional positions“ and “moves that seemed foolish but inevitably led to victory” (WSJ, January 5, 2017). In short, the AI went into playing the game without conceptual blinders. It developed novel (and effective) strategies based on reality, rather than on preconceived views of how the game “ought” to be played. Had the AI been programmed by Go masters, it wouldn’t have fared as well. It succeeded because it lacked the limitations that we as human beings unknowingly use when we approach a problem.

go-game-boardIF our assumptions create limits, then our outcomes are limited.

The same problem – our own assumptions – proscribes the limits of what we can do in science and medicine. If we simply program a computer to “delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease by lowering all known risk factors”, it might succeed, but the solution would be limited by how we set up the problem. In short, assumptions limit outcomes. If we merely restrict the program to lowering risks, then a computer program can’t show us how to cure Alzheimer’s. Such a program might, for example, recommend dietary changes, moving away from major highways and pollution, lowering blood pressure, avoiding infections, improving dental hygiene, lowering stress, and a myriad other changes that might delay Alzheimer’s. But the programs, the questions we pose, presuppose that Alzheimer’s can’t cured or prevented, only delayed. If we preclude finding a way to win, then all we find is a better way to lose.

Consider the historical analogs. If I want more efficient communication, I don’t ask a computer to design a better telegraph. If I want more efficient transportation, I don’t ask the computer to design a faster horse. If I want to cure polio, I don’t program a computer to design a better iron lung. And if I want to cure Alzheimer’s, I shouldn’t design a better way to attack amyloid, tau proteins, inflammation, or mitochondrial dysfunction. Merely because I’ve already assumed that those are the only strategies, I have limited my outcomes. If Alzheimer’s interventions are restricted to merely optimizing old strategies, we will never cure it.

Why be satisfied with a better telegraph, a faster horse, or a more efficient iron lung?

Programmed solutions, based on preconceived limits are a case of GIGO: “garbage in, garbage out”. True advances in science and medicine are not incremental; they demand innovative perceptions and constant reexamination of our premises. The example of an AI beating the world’s reigning Go champion wasn’t the result of incremental improvements in coding all of the Go strategies known to previous champions into a program and then tasking the program with implementing those accepted strategies. The AI was tasked with winning, regardless of previously accepted strategies. As a result, the AI actually WON, unexpectedly, but reliably, using innovative, startling, and unexpected approaches.

If we want to cure Alzheimer’s disease, we can’t use incremental approaches to time-worn (and uniformly ineffective) strategies. Like the AI playing Go, we need to stop focusing on accepted strategies and ask the fundamental question: how do we win? Not “how do we optimize the same old strategies?”, but how do we actually WIN? We shouldn’t rely on “programmed” approaches; we should toss out our preconceived programs, and ask how to win. With regard to Alzheimer’s disease, we need to stop asking how to optimize losing strategies and ask how to cure Alzheimer’s. Not “how do we lower amyloid levels?” or “how do we reduce tau tangles?”, but how do we cure and prevent the disease in the first place? If we really want to make a difference, then we need to free ourselves from our preconceptions and our old programming, and begin to ask the fundamental question: how can we cure Alzheimer’s?

Truly innovative approaches demand a ruthless reassessment of our assumptions.

We will cure Alzheimer’s only if we have the wit to truly use our own intelligence, with honesty, perceptiveness, and a willingness to examine reality.

November 22, 2016

Teaching Cells to Fish

Aging is the slowing down of active molecular turnover, not the passive accumulation of damage. Damage certainly accumulates, but only because turnover is no longer keeping up with that damage.

It’s much like asking why one car falls apart, when another car looks like it just came out of the showroom. It’s not so much a matter of damage (although if you live up north and the road salt eats away at your undercarriage, that’s another matter), as it is a matter of how well a car is cared for. I’ve see an 80-year-old Duesenberg that looks a lot better than my 4-year-old SUV. It’s not how well either car was made, nor how long either car has been around, but how well each car was cared for. If I don’t care for my SUV, my SUV rusts; if a car collector gives weekly (even daily) care to a Duesenberg, then that Duesenberg may well last forever.

The parallel is apt. The reason that “old cells” fall apart isn’t that they’ve been around a long time, nor even that they are continually being exposed to various insults. The reason “old cells” fall apart is that their maintenance functions slow noticeably and that maintenance fails to keep up with the quotidian damage occurring within living cells. If we look at knees, for example, the reason that our chondrocytes fail isn’t a matter of how many years you’ve been on the planet, nor even a matter of how many miles a day you spend walking around. The reason chondrocytes fail is because their maintenance functions slow down and stop keeping up with the daily damage. As it turns out, that deceleration in maintenance occurs because of changes in gene expression, which occur because telomeres shorten, which occur because cells divide. And, not at all surprisingly, the number of those cell divisions is related to how long you’ve been on the planet (how old you are) and how many miles you walk (or if you play basketball). In short, osteoarthritis is distantly related to your age and to the “mileage” you incur, but not directly so. The problem is not really the age nor is it the mileage; the problem is the failure to repair the routine damage and THAT failure is directly controlled by changes in gene expression.

So what?

The telomeres and gene expression may play a central role, but if your age and the “mileage” is distantly causing all those changes in cell division, telomere lengths, gene expression, and failing cell maintenance, then what’s the difference? Why bother with all the complexity? Why not accept that age and your “mileage” are the cause of aging diseases and stop fussing? Why not simply accept age-related disease?

Because we can change it.

The question isn’t “why does this happen?” so much as “what can we do about it?” We can’t change your age and it’s hard to avoid a certain amount of “mileage” in your daily life, but we CAN change telomeres, gene expression, and cell maintenance. In fact, we can reset the entire process and end up with cells that keep up with damage, just as your cells did when you were younger.

Until now, everyone who has tried to deal with only the damage (or the damaged cells) failed because they focused on damage rather than focusing on repair. For example, if you focus only on cell damage (as most big pharma and biotech companies do when they go after beta amyloid or tau proteins in trying to cure Alzheimer’s disease), then any clinical effect is transient and the disease continues to progress – which is why companies like Eli Lily, Biogen, TauRx, and dozens of other companies are frustrated. And small wonder. Or if you focus only on the damaged cells (and try removing them), then the clinical effect is not only transient, but will end up accelerating deterioration (as discussed in last week’s blog, see figure below) – which is why companies like Unity will be frustrated. Their approaches fail not because they don’t address the damage, but because they fail to understand the deceleration of dynamic cell maintenance that occurs with age – and fail to understand the most effective single clinical target. The key target is not damage, nor damaged cells, but the changes in gene expression that permit that damage, and those damaged cells, to lead to pathology. We can’t cure Alzheimer’s or osteoarthritis by removing senescent cells, but we can cure them by resetting those same cells.

Why you shouldn't kill senescent cells.

Why you shouldn’t kill senescent cells.

In the cases of removing senescent cells (an approach Unity advocates), wouldn’t it be better to remove the damaged cells and then reset the telomeres of those that remain? But why remove the damaged cells if you can reset them as well, with the result that they can now deal with the damage and remove it – as well as young cells do?

Why remove senescent cells at all?

While you could first remove senescent cells, then add telomerase so that the remaining cells could divide without significant degradation of function, why would you bother? You could much more easily, more simply, and more effectively treat all the cells in an aging tissue, reset their aging process and have no need to ever remove senescent cells in the first place. Instead of removing them, you simply turn them into “younger” and more functional cells. For an analogy, imagine that we have a therapy that could turn cancer cells into normal cells. If that were true, why would anyone first surgically remove a tumor? If you could really “reset” cancer cells into normal cells, there would be no need to do a surgical removal in the first place. While there is no such therapy for cancer cells, the analogy is still useful. Removing senescent cells is not only counter-productive, but (if we reset gene expression) entirely unnecessary.

Removal is unnecessary (both as to cost and pathology), risky, and medically contraindicated. You’d be performing a completely unnecessary procedure when a more cost-effective and reliable procedure was available. It would be exactly like removing your tonsils if you already had overwhelming data showing that an antibiotic was reliable, cheap, and without risk.

A cell with full telomere lengths – regardless of prior history – is already superior. The accumulated damage is not a static phenomenon, but a dynamic one. Reset cells can clean up damage. This is not merely theory, but supported well in fact, based on both human cells and whole animal studies. We shouldn’t think of damage as something that merely accumulates passively. All molecules are continually being recycled. The reason some molecular pools show increased damage isn’t because molecules denature, but because the rate of turnover slows, thereby allowing denatured molecules (damage) to increase within the pool.

Try this analogy: we have two buildings. One is run by a company that invests heavily in maintenance costs, the other is run by a company that cut its maintenance budget by 50%. The first building is clean and well-kept, the second building is dirty and poorly-kept. Would you rather raze the second building and then rebuild it or would you rather increase the maintenance budget back to a full maintenance schedule and end up with a clean building? This is precisely the case with young versus old cells: the problem is not the dirt that accumulates, the problem is that no one is paying for routine maintenance. There are cells that are “too senescent” to save, but almost all the cells in human age-related disease can be reset with good clinical outcome. There is no reason to remove senescent cells any more than (in the case of a dirty building), we need to send in the dynamite and bulldozers.

Too often, we try to approach the damage rather than looking at the longer view. Instead of addressing the process, we address the outcome. It’s like the problem that often occurs in global philanthropy, where we see famine and think we can solve the problem with food alone. While the approach is necessary – as a stopgap – many are surprised to find that simply providing free food for one year, results in bankrupt farmers and recurrent famines in the following years. Or we provide free medical care in a poor nation, then wonder why there is a dearth of medical practitioners in years to come, without realizing we have put them out of business and accidentally encouraged them to emigrate to someplace they can make a living and feed their families. We intend well, but we perpetuate the problem we are desperately trying to solve. Treating famine or medical problems, like treating the fundamental causes of age-related disease, is not simple and cannot be effectively addressed with band aids and superficial interventions, such as addressing damage alone or removing senescent cells. Effective clinical intervention – like effective interventions in famine or global healthcare – require a sophisticated understanding of the complexity of cell function, an understanding of the dynamic changes that underlie age-related pathology.

An adage (variously attributed to dozens of sources) about fish and fishing provides a useful analogy here:

Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day.

Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.

If we want to intervene effectively in age-related diseases – whether Alzheimer’s, osteoarthritis, or myriad other problems of aging – we shouldn’t throw fish at medical problems.

We should teach our cells to fish.

 

November 15, 2016

Close to a Cure

We are now within two years of a cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

What a brash and disruptive claim! What hubris! Yet events are coming together, underlining a new and far more complete understanding of the disease, illuminating the cause, supporting the ability to intervene, safely and effectively. We finally see a way to intervene in the basic pathology, underlining the potential to both prevent and cure Alzheimer’s disease.

But why has it taken so long? Why was Alzheimer’s disease first defined 110 years ago, and yet remains totally beyond our ability to intervene even now? Why have all other approaches, whether those of big pharma or those of biotech, failed utterly? Why has not a single clinical trial shown any ability to change the progress of this frightening disease? Why is Alzheimer’s disease not only called “the disease that steals human souls”, but also called the “graveyard of companies”? Why has every single approach (which has at most shown only an effect on biomarkers, such as beta amyloid), still failed to show any change in the cognitive decline in patients with this disease? Why have we failed universally, until now?

Because every approach has concentrated on effects, not on causes.

Currently, most approaches target beta amyloid, many target tau proteins, and some target mitochondrial function, inflammation, free radicals, and other processes, but no one targets these problems as a single, unified, overarching process. Alzheimer’s isn’t caused by any one of these disparate processes, but by a broader, more complex process that results in every one of these individual problems. Beta amyloid isn’t a cause, but a biomarker. Equally, tau proteins, phosphodiesterase levels, APOE4, presenilins, and a host of other markers are effects, not causes. The actual cause lies upstream and constitutes the root cause of the dozens of separate effects that are the futile downstream targets of every current FDA trial aimed at Alzheimer’s disease. Understanding this, we will be targeting the “upstream” problem, rather than the dozens of processes that others target individually and without success. Our animal studies support the ability to effectively intervene in human disease: when we say that we are about to cure Alzheimer’s disease, we base claim that on a clear and consistent theoretical model, supported by equally clear and consistent data.

Within the next few months, we will begin our FDA toxicity study, preparatory to obtaining an IND that will permit us to begin our FDA human trial. Our toxicity study will take 6 months and will meet FDA requirements for human safety data. Our first human trial is planned to begin one year from now and is intended to show not only safety, but a clear efficacy. We will include a dozen human volunteers, each with (not just early, but) moderate Alzheimer’s disease and our human trial will last 6 months, including a single treatment and multiple measurements of behavior, laboratory tests, and brain scans. We expect to show unambiguous cognitive improvement within that six-month period. We are confident that we cannot merely slow, not merely stop, but reverse much of the cognitive decline in our twelve patients. We intend to demonstrate an ability to cure Alzheimer’s disease clearly and credibly.

Curing Alzheimer’s requires investments of money, time, and thought. The toxicity study costs 1 million dollars; the human trial costs 2.5 million dollars. Telocyte has half a million dollars committed to this effort and at least one group of investors with a firm interest in taking us all the way through the human trials. We are close and we grow closer each day.

After 110 years, we are about to cure Alzheimer’s.

October 18, 2016

The Carpets of Alzheimer’s Disease

Why do Alzheimer’s interventions always fail?

Whether you ask investors or pharmaceutical companies, it has become axiomatic that Alzheimer’s “has been a graveyard for many a company”, regardless of what they try. But in a fundamental way, all past and all current companies – whether big pharma or small biotech – try the same approach. The problem is that while they work hard at the details, they never examine their premises. They uniformly fail to appreciate the conceptual complexity involved in the pathology of Alzheimer’s. They clearly see the technical complexity, but ignore the deeper complexity. They see the specific molecule and the specific gene, but they ignore the ongoing processes that drive Alzheimer’s. Focusing on a simplistic interpretation of the pathology, they apply themselves – if with admirable dedication and financing – to the specific details, such a beta amyloid deposition.

But WHY do we have beta amyloid deposits? Why do tau proteins tangle, why do mitochondria get sloppy, and why does inflammation occur in the first place? Focusing on outcomes, rather than basic processes explains why all prior efforts have failed to affect the course of the disease, let alone offer a cure for Alzheimer’s.

Let’s use an analogy: think of a maintenance service. Any big organization, (university, pharmaceutical firm, group law practice, or hospital) has a maintenance budget. Routine maintenance ensures that – in the offices, clinics, or laboratories – carpets are vacuumed, walls are repainted, windows are cleaned, floors are mopped, and all the little details are taken care of on a regular basis. These are the details that make a place appear clean and well-cared for, providing a pleasant and healthy location. In most offices (as in our cells), we are often unaware of the maintenance, but quite aware of the end result: an agreeable location to work or visit. In any good workplace, as in our cells, maintenance is efficient and ongoing.

That’s true in young cells, but what happens in old cells?

Imagine what happens to a building if we cut its maintenance budget by 90%. Carpets begin to show dirt, windows become less clear, walls develop nicks and marks, and floors grow grimy and sticky. This is precisely what happens in old cells: we cut back on the maintenance and the result is that cells becomes less functional, because without continual maintenance, damage gradually accumulates. In the nervous system, beta amyloid, tau proteins, and a host of other things “sit around” without being recycled efficiently and quickly. Maintenance is poor and our cells accumulate damage.

All previous Alzheimer’s research has ignored the cut back in maintenance and focused on only a single facet, such as beta amyloid. You might say that they focused only on the dirty carpet and ignored the walls, the windows, and the floors. Even then, they have focused only on the “dirt”, and ignored the cut back in maintenance. Imagine an organization that has cut its maintenance budget. Realizing that they have a problem, they call in an outside specialist to focus exclusively on the loose dirt in the carpet, while ignoring the carpet stains, ignoring the window, walls, and floors, and then only coming in once. What happens? The carpets look better for a few days, but the office still becomes increasingly grungy and unpleasant. In the same way, if we use monoclonal antibodies (the outside specialist) to focus on beta amyloid plaque, the plaques may improve temporarily, but the Alzheimer’s disease continues and it is definitely unpleasant. Various companies have focused on various parts of the problem – the floors, the walls, the windows, or the carpets – but none of them have fixed the maintenance, so the fundamental problem continues. You can put a lot of effort and money into treating only small parts of Alzheimer’s, or you can understand the complex and dynamic nature of cell maintenance. Ironically, once you understand the complexity, the solution becomes simple.

The best solution is to reset cell maintenance to that of younger cells. Neurons and glial cells can again function normally, maintaining themselves and the cells around them. The outcome should be not another “graveyard for companies”, but life beyond Alzheimer’s .

 

July 20, 2016

Curing Disease: More Insight Instead of Mere Effort

 

Curing disease correlates with insight, not blind effort.

There is an eternal trade-off between insight and effort. If we think carefully, understand the problem, and plan, then effort is minimized. If (as too often happens) we think carelessly, misunderstand the problem, and rely on hope instead of planning, then effort is not only maximized, but is usually a complete waste. Lacking insight, we foolishly flush both money and effort down the drain. In the case of clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease – and in fact, all age-related diseases – this is precisely the case.

The major problem is a naïve complaisance that we already understand aging pathology.

If there was a single concept that is key to all of aging, it is the notion that everything in our organs, in our tissues, and in our cells is dynamically and actively in flux, rather than being a set of organs, tissues, cells, and molecules that statically and passively deteriorate. Aging isn’t just entropy; aging is entropy with insufficient biological response. Senescent cells no longer keep up with entropy, while young cells manage entropy quite handily. At the tissue level, the best example might be bone. We don’t form just bone and then leave it to the mercy of entropy, rather we continually recycle bony tissue throughout our lives – although more-and-more slowly as our osteocytes lose telomere length. This is equally true at the molecular level, for example the collagen and elastin molecules in our skin. We don’t finish forming collagen and elastin in our youth and then leave it to the vagaries of entropy, rather we continually recycle collagen and elastin molecules throughout our lives, although more-and-more slowly as our skin cells lose telomere length. Aging is not a process in which a fixed amount of bone, collagen, or elastin gradually erodes, denatures, or becomes damaged. Rather, aging is a process in which the rate of recycling of bone, collagen, or elastin gradually slows down as our shortening telomeres alter gene expression, slowing the rate of molecular turnover, and allowing damage to get ahead of the game. We don’t age because we are damaged, we age because cells with shortening telomeres no longer keep up with the damage.

The same is true not only of biological aging as a general process, but equally true of every age-related disease specifically. Vascular disease is not a disease in which our arteries are a static tissue that gradually gives way to an erosive entropy, but an active and dynamic set of cells that gradually slow their turnover of critical cellular components, culminating in the failure of endothelial cell function, the increasing pathology of the subendothelial layer, and the clinical outcomes of myocardial infarction, stroke, and a dozen other medical problems. Merely treating cholesterol, blood pressure, and hundreds of other specific pathological findings does nothing to reset the epigenetic changes that lie upstream and that cause those myriad changes. Small wonder that we fail to change the course of arterial disease if our only interventions are merely “stents and statins”.

Nor is Alzheimer’s a disease in which beta amyloid and tau proteins passively accumulate over time as they become denatured, resulting in neuronal death and cognitive failure. Alzheimer’s is a disease in which the turnover – the binding, the uptake, the degradation, and the replacement – of key molecules gradually slows down with telomere shortening, culminating in the failure of both glial cell and neuron function, the accumulation of plaques and tangles, and ending finally in a profound human tragedy. The cause is the change in gene expression, not the more obvious plaques and tangles.

Our lack of insight, even when we exert Herculean efforts – enormous clinical trials, immense amounts of funding, and years of work – is striking for a complete failure of every clinical trial aimed at Alzheimer’s disease. Naively, we target beta amyloid, tau proteins, phosphodiesterase, immune responses, and growth factors, without ever understanding the subtle upstream causes of these obvious downstream effects. Aging, aging diseases, and especially Alzheimer’s disease are not amenable to mere well-intended efforts. Without insight, our funding, our time, and our exertions are useless. Worse yet, that same funding time, and exertion could be used quite effectively, if used intelligently. If our target is to cure the diseases of aging, then we don’t need more effort, but more thought. However well intentioned, however much investment, however many grants, and however many clinical trials, all will be wasted unless we understand the aging process. Aging is not a passive accumulation of damage, but an active process in which damage accumulates because cells change their patterns of gene expression, patterns which can be reset.

Curing Alzheimer’s requires insight and intelligence, not naive hope and wasted effort.

 

 

July 5, 2016

Dynamic versus Static – Going to Mars or Curing AD

Innovation requires novel thinking, not incremental actions.

We can cure age-related diseases – such as Alzheimer’s – not with funding, intelligence, or effort alone, but only if we reassess our assumptions. Until we look carefully at our conceptual foundations, we cannot expect to build a therapeutic structure. Ironically, the key problem lies in our looking at biology, medicine, and disease as static, passive processes. One would think we would see these processes as active and dynamic, but oddly enough, we don’t.

Consider an analogy: going to visit Mars.

Clearly, we need some essentials of life-support, such as oxygen and water. If we start by asking ourselves how much of each we need per day per person, then how many days and how many persons, we end up with an enormous need for both: huge amounts of oxygen, huge amounts of water. After all, we don’t want to run out of oxygen or water, do we?

Remember, however, that in a closed system (such as a vehicle going to Mars), that neither oxygen nor water are actually used up en route, only changed from one form (such as oxygen molecules) to another (such as carbon dioxide molecules). The water molecules may be in the form of body waste, but they are still present in the vehicle. And both oxygen and water – given energy and technical forethought – can be recycled and reused indefinitely. The practical question is not simply “how much oxygen and water do we need”, but “how efficiently and quickly can we recycle oxygen and water?” In short, the key question isn’t the static and passive one of “how fast are we using up our oxygen and water?”. The key question is the active and dynamic one of “how does the rate of recycling compare to the rate of oxygen and water use?”

The analogy is exact.

In the case of Alzheimer’s, for example, the key question isn’t “how can we prevent the accumulation of beta amyloid and tau protein?”, but rather “how can we increase the rate of recycling of molecules such as beta amyloid and tau proteins?” The former question would be like asking “how can we prevent the use of oxygen and water?”, while we should be asking “how can we increase the recycling efficiency of oxygen and water?”

Current approaches to treating Alzheimer’s disease focus inordinate funding, intelligence, and effort on the wrong question. Small wonder they fail.

June 18, 2016

Faster Horses?

Often, when problems seem intractable, we’re asking the wrong questions.

We want to get to the moon: how can we jump higher? We want to get to the stars: how can we make bigger rockets? As Henry Ford once suggested, people wanted a better way to travel, so they wanted to know how to breed faster horses. Wrong questions.

Aging, and its multiple diseases are no different.

Without realizing it, we start by assuming that we already understand aging, then can’t understand why nothing cures the diseases of aging. Small wonder that Margaret Chan, the director of the WHO, stated we should “give up the curative model” of diseases of aging. In her report late last year, she urged us to focus on inequity and prejudice. If we had focused on inequity and prejudice in 1950 when polio was rampant, we would still have polio. Everyone would have an equal opportunity to have leg braces or access to iron lungs and we would have laws to prevent anyone “micro-aggressing” against those with a limp. Good things in their own way, but would you rather have equitable iron lungs or would you prefer to have a cure for polio? Equitable disease or disease prevention?

The WHO believes in political solutions – social band aids – rather than medical solutions. Frustration is understandable: so many approaches appear so futile. We can prevent polio, yet it seems impossible to prevent Alzheimer’s disease. Small wonder that few of us truly believe that we can do anything substantial and innovative. Like people determined to jump higher and higher, in hopes of reaching the moon on muscle power alone, we celebrate the tiniest elevation increase. Eli Lilly and company celebrated a possible 3 month delay (as their Alzheimer’s patients still progressed to an intractable death), and their stock price jumped higher as well. Yet, no matter how high we learn to jump, no matter how we learn to “breed faster horses”, we are still asking the wrong questions. Small wonder success appears impossible.

What is Alzheimer’s disease? Is it merely a slow, passive accumulation of amyloid and tau tangles? Or are those merely the effects of some more important upstream cause? We treat the symptoms, we treat the effects, then become frustrated when the disease continues its slow sweep of souls into oblivion.

Yet if we could understand what underlies a disease like Alzheimer’s, we might yet reach not only the moon, but the stars. To do so will take a far better way to travel than merely “faster horses”.

In order to cure, we first need to understand.

 

April 12, 2016

Rational Behavior

We waste stunning amounts of money and effort on comprehensively ineffective trials.

As a recent article points out, in the past 15 years, there have been 123 Alzheimer drug failures and, while four medicines have been approved, none of them affect the progress of the disease. Symptomatic therapy at best, we have no medications – none – that have any effect on the disease or on its mortality. A quick look at clinicaltrials.gov lists almost 1,500 interventional trials aimed at treating Alzheimer’s disease, yet once again there is no evidence that any of these trials has resulted (or will result) in an intervention that changes the outcome of Alzheimer’s disease.

Federal funding for Alzheimer’s is estimated at almost half a billion dollars and some have estimated that Eli Lilly’s potential treatment for Alzheimer’s, solanezumab, may end up costing the company one billion dollars to achieve approval of that drug alone, even though there is no evidence that it actually prevents or cures the disease. The most optimistic interpretation of the statistical data of thousands of patients over many years, would be stretching it to suggest it might possibly delay cognitive decline and death by 2-3 months over an eight year period from diagnosis to death. Even that wishful thought is doubtful and scarcely any consolation to those enduring an extra handful of weeks in a skilled care nursing home (or having to pay for it).

No matter what the current target of choice – beta amyloid, tau proteins, inflammation, or any other target-du-jour – none of these targets have ever been shown to offer a glimmer of hope. Despite the history of repeated and consistent failure, we continue to spend (and vote to spend) money on these same drug targets. We eagerly bash our empty heads against the same solid brick wall, naively hoping that one day we fill find that the wall will be made of air (like the air in our brains, which leads to our irrational behavior). The apocryphal observation pertains: the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. We waste money and effort on ineffective and expensive trials aimed at targets that we know are futile.

The irony – and the tragedy – is that we can both prevent and cure Alzheimer’s disease, both effectively and inexpensively if we understand the actual pathology and target the underlying causes. We could do, effectively and inexpensively, what big pharma has failed to do ineffectively and expensively. What big pharma can’t do for one billion dollars, Telocyte can do for 0.5% of that figure, simply by aiming at the right target.

We need rationality, insight, and just enough funding to prove it can be done.

February 16, 2016

Unexamined Assumptions

The problem with curing Alzheimer’s is, as with so much of our understanding of aging and age-related diseases, that we make unexamined assumptions. Let me admit that many of our unexamined assumptions are either useful or reasonable. I assume that the sun will come up again tomorrow morning and that’s a useful and reasonable assumption. Useful, in that it allows me to plan my future, reasonable in that the sun has been coming up every morning for quite a while and is therefore likely to do so tomorrow as well. Certain unexamined assumptions are equally justifiable in dealing with Alzheimer’s disease. In the strictly poetic sense, Alzheimer’s certainly is the disease that “steals our souls”, yet no physician or researcher would actually make the assumption that the mind is some vague ethereal quantity that can be stolen by demons, let alone go on to promulgate a theory of Alzheimer’s pathology based on this assumption.

Yet we make exactly that same error, using an unexamined assumption, when we blithely assume that aging is simply the accumulation of damage and, pari passu, that Alzheimer’s disease is simply the accumulation of damaged molecules, be they amyloid, tau tangles, or altered mitochondrial enzymes. This unexamined assumption lies behind almost innumerable multi-million dollar FDA trials, academic papers, and clinical interventions. We assume, without even realizing we have made the assumption, that Alzheimer’s is merely the accumulation of damaged molecules.

We make the same unexamined assumption in looking at other age-related diseases and in the broader field of aging itself. We delve into the details of advanced glycation end-products (AGE), lipofuscin, cross-linking, and other molecular pools showing “accumulative damage”, all the time never realizing that we are making the same fallacy. We are working with completely unexamined (and erroneous) assumptions about how aging works. We naively assume that aging occurs – and age-related diseases follow – merely because things “rust” over time. We age because “molecules fall apart.”

 

Yet the data and logic both say differently. Let me give you a useful analogy: the cell phone. Consider a large pool (several thousand) of people who own cell phones. We know that if we examine any SINGLE cell phone, the best predictor of failure is how long it has been since production. If, however, we want to predict the percentage of failures in any large pool of owners, the best predictor is not time-since-production, but length-of-contract, that is, how often does it get turned over and replaced? Imagine two large pools of cell phone owners. In group A, the cell phones are replaced annually, with a failure rate (at equilibrium) of approximately 1%. In group B, the cell phones are replaced every ten years, with a failure rate (at equilibrium) of approximately 80%. In both groups, the rate of failure of any individual phone is the same. Furthermore, the rate of failure is only marginally related to the “genes”, i.e., whether the phone is an Apple iPhone, an Android, or some other type (a different “allele”). As the turnover rate (contract length to replacement) lengthens, the percent of failed cell phones climbs dramatically, regardless of the failure rate of any individual cell phone. In a pool of cell phones, “aging” is not a matter of passively accumulated damage, but of how actively we replace them.

The same is occurring in molecular pools in biological systems. The key predictor of “denatured” or dysfunctional molecules (e.g., AGE, beta amyloid microaggregates, cross-linking, elastin failure, collagen stiffening, etc) is not the rate of damage but the rate of turnover. In the case of cell aging, when we reset gene expression (reset telomere length) we reset the turnover rates (anabolism and catabolism rates) of all molecular pools to those typical of “young” cells. The outcome is that molecule pool turnover is more than sufficient to deal with typical rates of damage.

Without realizing it, most of us make the mistake of thinking of molecular pools as static and damage as purely accumulative. The reality is that such pools are dynamic and the key dependent variable (as with cell phones) is not the passive rate of damage, but the active rate of turnover.

Unless we understand – and examine – our assumptions, we can never expect to cure age-related diseases. Once we start down the wrong path, all the logic and data in the world can’t make up for the fact that we are looking in the wrong place. It’s time we stopped blaming “demons” and starting thinking carefully.

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