Michael Fossel Michael is President of Telocyte

December 13, 2016

Telomeres: The Purloined Letter of Aging

     “What is only complex is mistaken (a not unusual error) for what is profound.”

                                                Edgar Allen Poe

 Edgar Allen Poe is still well-known for his poetry, he is less well-known for his detective stories. Some 170 years ago, his Parisian amateur detective, Dupin, was the conceptual forerunner for Sherlock Holmes, who made his London debut almost half a century later. Poe also made a series of observations that echo, even today, as we try to understand aging, age-related disease, and how we can cure them.

Poe’s detective pointed out that even intelligent, meticulous investigators are often oblivious to the obvious. The same can even be true of modern scientific investigators, who may focus so closely on their hard-won facts that the relationships between those facts – and their implications – are often overlooked. In aging research, for example, many investigators focus so intensely on genes, proteins, and small-molecular therapies, that they can miss the broader picture and miss an effective approach to curing the diseases of aging. Putting it simply, too often we focus our intellect, our education, and our strenuous effort on the “nouns”, but we entirely miss the “verbs”. We know the data, we fail to see what it means.

The intellect, the education, the dedication, and the funding are enormous, but our focus is off-target and the results, as expected, are futile. Truth, Poe tells us, is frequently overlooked, regardless of how intense our investigation. In describing such a case (in Poe’s case a policeman, in our case a scientist), Poe put it this way:

“… he erred continually by the very intensity of his investigations. He impaired his vision by holding the object too close. He might see, perhaps, one or two points with unusual clearness, but in so doing he, necessarily, lost sight of the matter as a whole. Thus there is such a thing as being too profound. Truth is not always in a well. In fact, as regards the more important knowledge, I do believe that she is invariably superficial.”

 As Poe suggest, we seek truth in the depth of a well in a valley, while truth is usually sitting in plain sight on the (easily visualized) mountain tops surrounding that valley. Such is the case with aging. It’s not that the truth is simple, for aging is far more complex than most of us give it credit for, but the truth is not found in the narrow details so much as it found in the overview of those details. The truth really is on the mountain tops, not in the bottom of a well, even when that well includes reams of data. It’s not the amount of data that is crucial, but the implications of that data. To give an example from clinical medicine, I may know everything about a patient’s fever, their hypotension, their abnormal white count, and their vomiting, but the numbers alone aren’t nearly as important as the realization that the patient has Ebola. Curing an Ebola infection cannot be relegated to lowering a fever, increasing the IV fluid, removing white cells, and given an anti-emetic. It’s not the individual therapies that cure Ebola, it’s the realization that you’re dealing with a viral infection and the use of a more general – and more effective – therapy, whether an antiviral or an immunization.

There is a parallel in understanding aging.

Treating the diseases of aging is not a matter of using individual therapies, but a matter of understanding the more profound relationships that change in aging cells. Until we do so, we will continue to fail when we try monoclonal antibodies for beta amyloid – as Eli Lilly finally realized with its Solanezumab trials – or merely attack tau proteins, mitochondrial changes, inflammation, or other targets. In each case, we have mistaken a plethora of data for a profundity of data. Only when we realize the actual complexity, the dynamic biological relationships, the profound effects of epigenetic changes, the role of telomeres as a therapeutic target, and that the fundamental pathology of aging and age-related diseases is rooted in cell senescence, only then will we — to our own vast and naïve surprise — discover that we can cure most of the diseases that still plague humankind.

 

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