Michael Fossel Michael is President of Telocyte

November 8, 2016

Revolution in Medicine

Every pharmaceutical firm, every biotech company, every hospital, every clinic, and every conference makes revolutionary claims, albeit seldom with any logic or thought behind the claims. Every product is a “revolutionary” therapy, every surgery is a “revolutionary” procedure, and everyone has a “revolutionary” way of looking at clinical medicine. Reality is strikingly different. Despite claims to the contrary, almost all advances in medicine are accretionary, not revolutionary. About sixty percent of all FDA applications for “breakthrough” status are turned down for not being breakthroughs, but merely incremental advances (if that). Even granting a third of these applications is overly kind, but then breakthroughs, like revolutions, are remarkably rare. I am reminded of my years consulting for hospitals around the world, where I was entertained to find every hospital, in every town, in every country, bragging that they were ranked as “one of the best ten hospitals!” Sometimes, they bragged that they were THE best hospital. Somehow, it appears that thousands of hospitals are among the best ten hospitals and hundreds are THE best hospital. In the entire world or on that block?

It clearly depends on who’s counting and on who does the ranking.

Therapies are much the same: they are seldom “the best” (in the world?) and they are almost never revolutionary. To the contrary, almost all current therapy is based on incremental change: we find a slightly better statin, an antibiotic with slightly less resistance (at least this year), and a procedure with a slightly lower risk. We rank our interventions by statistical significance and we deal with percentage points in the adverse effect profile. Scarcely the stuff of revolution.

We can do better; much better. To do so, however, requires both an open mind and a very disciplined one. We need both creativity and intelligence to envision a path to revolutionary therapies. If we do so, we may be able to cure diseases that are thought to be “incurable”, a true revolution I both clinical thinking and clinical practice.

Many people, in a totally practical vein, think of diseases in three categories. The first includes those diseases that we have “cures” for, by means of vaccines, antibiotics, and routine surgeries (think of tetanus, cellulitis, and appendicitis). The second category includes diseases for which we have no cure yet, but for which we see a cure on the horizon (think of treating sickle cell anemia with gene therapy). This second category includes type 1 diabetes: while we use insulin to good effect, we eagerly imagine the days when we simply replace the missing cells in the pancreas and truly cure diabetes. While we have – or imagine that we may soon have – true cures for these diseases in both the first two categories, the third category brings a sense of futility. When it comes to age-related disease (think of Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, etc.), we are caught up by the assumption that while we can treat symptoms, use grafts or stents, lower the risk factors, or replace the damaged part (a total knee replacement comes to mind), we will never be able to entirely prevent or cure the underlying disease. After all, they’re simply the outcome of aging, yes? And who could possibly change the aging process?

Oddly enough, we already have.

We first showed we could reverse cell aging in 1999, followed by the reversal of tissue aging (in the laboratory) in the following few years. The question isn’t “can we reverse the aging process in human cells or tissues”, but “can we reverse the aging process in human patients”? Can we take someone with age-related disease, treat them, and reverse the disease reverse at the cellular and genetic levels? Can we prevent and cure age-related disease? Based on both theory and animal data, the answer is almost certainly to be “yes, we can”. All it requires is intelligence, a modicum of work, and a small commitment of funding.

Instead of treating Alzheimer’s as something to live with, we can treat it and have it be something we can live without. Only then we will have a true revolution.

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